Electric Guitar Lesson – “Harmony Beyond the Music”

Harmony is anything to behold with regards to music. Whether it’s the beauty of vocal tranquility, the impressiveness of guitar harmonies, or the force of symphonic harmonies, it’s important that tranquility be executed effectively. This really is naturally equally the case with regards to non-musical applications within music. But instead of focus found on the apparent need within a band or group, I wish To focus found on the value of tranquility in the bigger pic. Specifically, those who help the band; and a lot more particularly, the sound technology team.

I’ve been a guitarist for over 20 years and an sound engineer for 15 of those. I’ve worked in the studio and in the live environment. But now I like to focus found on the live aspect. I have the special ability of being well-experienced behind the stage, in front of the stage, and found on the stage. I’ve experienced every emotion potential mixed with every character potential. It’s a surprisingly intense environment and it doesn’t take much to upset this quite delicate balance. There are a great deal of perfectionists striving to be ideal, and naturally not completely achieving it, specifically in their own notice. This can cause frustrations along with a tendency to project these feelings on others. So when anything goes incorrect that is from our control, we could tend to overreact.

I’m directing this at guitarists, just because I am 1 and that is who my site is for, but this will and generally does apply to any musician. We are able of authority with a surprisingly complex composition of insecurity and ego. These 3 ingredients (among countless others) when not kept in check, create for a fatal combination. The sound engineer(s) are the simplest target of the concoction, because (in our mind) their presence is to entirely serve our every sound reinforcement need. Now I’m not disputing that they exist to serve and that involves serving us, but the range of their serving is usually minimized by our narrow focus. If we can consciously initiate a positive symbiotic-serving relationship; then we have merely built the force of 1 team really working in tranquility, instead of 2 groups trying to work together. This needs mutual regard and trust, and an learning that errors and difficulties may happen.

Now if an sound engineer feels under-appreciated, disrespected, or is created to feel insignificant; they are more probably to entertain the temptation to succumb to a very unmotivated pursuit of quality in the service they are providing. This really is devastating to the objectives of all interested parties, it happens to be because damaging because any unmotivated guitarist or different musician in the band. So you are able to see why it happens to be important that this be prevented at all expense. All it takes is a superior rapport along with a genuine relationship. Respect the sound engineer for what they are doing, odds are they are as passionate about music as you may be. In fact, many are musicians themselves. Don’t be scared to ask them for input in regards to the music, you are amazed at what you hear.

Now if it sounds like I am placing the lion-share of the responsibility for tranquility found on the shoulders of the musicians, effectively I am. As musicians, we are among the foremost specialists on harmony; and that expertise is appropriate to all applications of tranquility. We are equally able of force (albeit more perceived than many realize); and to whom much is provided, much is needed. That being mentioned, I believe we are to focus on serving those who serve us; and with every bit as much passion as we serve up the tranquility that is the music we create.

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